About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
prime minister benjamin netanyahu before jetting to cairo for talks with the president of egypt, mohammad morsi. the urgency underscored by the carnage in benghazi. rockets are lobbying back and forth. israeli air attacks killing 27 more palestinians bringing the death toll to 137 just in the last week. >> now a spokesman for hamas sounded cautiously optimistic that a cease-fire could be at hand telling cnn we are close, we are on the edge. cnn has reporters blanketing the region to bring you the most comprehensive coverage of this crisis in gaza. fred pleitgen is in ashkelon, ben wedemans in gaza city. ben wedeman, good morning, set the scene for me. >> reporter: yes, brooke, it was a noisezy night and we saw intense bombardment just behind where i'm standing. that was proceeded by increasing sort of mounting reports that a cease-fire was about to be announced or a period of calm. but it appears that there were problems within the israeli government that prime minister benjamin netanyahu and his foreign minister lieberman didn't see eye to eye with the defense minister who was
senior hamas official who said that at 9:00 p.m. cairo time, 10:00 p.m. eastern standard time, that there would be an announcement in cairo, by an official, from the egyptian government and from hamas, announcing some sort of agreement for at least a temporary cease-fire. however, we're hearing from other hamas officials that israel has yet to agree to this proposed cease-fire and the israelis are saying there is nothing as of yet. but the idea is rather than send out broad guidelines for a period of peace and calm, they just want to see if both sides can keep the peace. now, one of the concerns here is that it is not just hamas who is operating in gaza, there are other groups like islamic jihad, affiliated with iran, even smaller splinter groups out there that hamas doesn't necessarily control completely. and therefore that's why they want to give this -- this initial period to see if the peace can indeed or quiet or calm can hold. >> ben, in terms of the entire region, and we're standing sort of by a map which i want to show our viewers, this and is of israel, you've got the
countries out of the meeting that they had in cairo, to show up here in gaza, perhaps tomorrow. we are waiting also to hear what is going to happen when it comes to the ground troops that israel has amassed on the border. now, right now we're hearing the sound of planes. and that usually means only one thing, that there will be air strikes that follow. and it is this time of night into the wee hours in the morning that things get very, very intense with lots of glass, air strikes. but we know that there have been blasts coming from the israeli ships in the sea. we ourselves have experienced loud booms and bangs coming from the sea, right there along the water. so there are concerns, people are not in the streets. most have hunkered down in their homes. most of the businesses have been closed. we know that more people have been killed here, including militants and civilians. and we know that more people have been injured. sara sidner. >> this is just unbelievable, this photo of a baby, the staffer holding the baby son. his name is omar. he was fatally burned, according to reports. b
envoy, a special envoy who went to cairo to meet with egyptian officials. the egyptian government, president mohamed morsi has been very much involved in trying to achieve a cease-fire together with representatives from turkey, from qatar. president and the secretary of state, the u.s. president, they've been talking to all sorts of leaders. let's see what happens. i'm only a few miles north of the gaza border right now. it's eerie here. the cafes are pretty much deserted. i was walking along the mediterranean beach. normally there would be a lot of people, it's a beautiful day here. pretty much deserted. i just got to an israeli area where there's a shelter for school kids. you hear the sirens going off. as soon as i got here a few hours ago the sirens went off. the soldiers rushed everyone into these bomb shelters, into these areas. you could see why people are terrified about what's going on. apparently in this particular inciden incident, when i heard the thuds, when i heard the sirens going off, the iron dome, this anti-missile system, seemed to have worked. we saw huge plume
understand there will be big demonstrations in cairo today. what are the risks right mow of egypt being drawn in fourth this conflict? >> the chances are actually fairly small. egypt has enough problems with it is with fighting militants next to gaza. egypt says it still respects the camp david peace accord signed with israel back in the late 1970s. obviously, we can expect egyptian politicians and leaders to make as much political hay as possible over this gaza violence, but it's highly unlikely that egypt has really the wherewithal or desire to get sucked into that conflict. i know from speaking to many egyptians, they don't have an appetite for it. they may sympathize with the people of gaza, but that sympathy does not extend to an eagerness or willingness to engage or become involved militarily in that conflict. >> all right, ben. in jerusalem this morning. thanks. >>> coming up later, soledad will be speaking to israel's deputy foreign minister. that's in our 7:00 hour. >>> here at home, president obama will have the four top leaders of congress over to the white house today to begin tal
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)